易哈佛 \ 大学英语 \ 2020年河南大学英语考试真题卷

2020年河南大学英语考试真题卷

2020年河南大学英语考试真题卷

  • 本卷共分为1大题50小题,作答时间为180分钟,总分100分,60分及格。
  • 试卷来源:易哈佛

一、单项选择题(共50题,每题2分。每题的备选项中,只有一个最符合题意)

3.[听力原文]M: Was the movie as good as you expected W: Quite beyond my expectation. It was a waste of time and money. How does the woman feel about the movie ()

A.The movie is excellent.
B.He wants to see the movie again.
C.He doesn’t have time to see it.
D.The movie is not good.

9.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.In the side street.
B.At the crossroads.
C.On the main road.
D.On the motorway.

10.Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.A more economical diesel fuel.
B.Characteristics of a new type of fuel.
C.Where a new energy source is located.
D.How to develop alternative energy sources.

11.Passage OneQuestions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.Because they need more protein than vegetables can supply.
B.Because they cannot digest vegetables.
C.Because they use more energy than adults.
D.Because they cannot easily digest milk and milk products.

12.Passage ThreeQuestions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.Reading magazine articles.
B.Reviewing book reports.
C.Writing research papers.
D.Selecting information sources.

13.Passage TwoQuestions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.The changes of life styles have no influence on business.
B.Different people may have completely different life styles.
C.It’s doubtful what life styles are changing.
D.Life styles of different people are the same.

14.Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.He’s studying for a test.
B.He lost his notes.
C.He missed the class.
D.He’s doing research on alternative.

15.Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.She wants Michael to check about the ATM service.
B.She wants to know why the elderly avoid using computerized banking services.
C.She wants Michael to have a try with their automatic banking services.
D.She wants more information about modern machines in banks.

16.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.They enjoyed the party better than the other guests,
B.They knew none of the other guests at the party.
C.They didn’t think much of the food and drinks.
D.They went a long way to attend the party.

17.Passage TwoQuestions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.Forty hours.
B.Less than forty hours.
C.About seventy hours.
D.Less than twenty-five hours.

18.Passage ThreeQuestions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.Gathering non-relevant materials.
B.Stealing another person’s ideas.
C.Sharing note with someone else.
D.Handing in assignments late.

19.Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.To help him explain the information to his roommate.
B.To help him write a paper.
C.To prepare for a test.
D.To tell her if notes are accurate.

20.Passage OneQuestions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.It preserves the vitamins.
B.It breaks down the vitamins.
C.It makes the meat easier to digest.
D.It reduces the protein content.

21.Passage TwoQuestions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.Changes in Life style have a strong influence on business.
B.Baby goods make money easily.
C.Business men are only interested in babies.
D.Business should always be ready to meet the babies’ needs.

22.Passage ThreeQuestions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.In the student’s own words.
B.In direct quotations.
C.In short phrases.
D.In shorthand.

23.Passage OneQuestions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.We should cat more meat than vegetables.
B.We should cat more vegetables than meat.
C.We should cat different kinds of vegetables.
D.We should cat fruit, cereals, fish, meat and vegetables.

24.Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.Because the services cost them more time.
B.Because the services are not as friendly as a bank clerk.
C.Because they are not sure how to use the services.
D.Because the clerks don’t offer help for them.

25.Most people think of lions as strictly African beasts, but only because they’ve been killed off almost everywhere else. Ten thousand years ago lions spanned vast sections of the globe. Now lions hold only a small fraction of their former habitat, and Asiatic lions, a subspecies that spit from African lions perhaps 100,000 years ago, hang on to an almost impossibly small slice of their former territory. India is the proud steward of these 300 or so lions, which live primarily in a 560-square-mile sanctuary (保护区). It took me a year and a half to get a permit to explore the entire Gir Forest---and no time at all to see why these lions became symbols of royalty and greatness. A tiger will hide in the forest unseen, but a lion stands its ground, curious and unafraid---lionhearted. Though they told me in subtle ways when I got too close, Gir’s lions allowed me unique glimpses into their lives during my three months in the forest. It’s odd to think that they are threatened by extinction; Gir has as many lions as it can hold--too many, in fact. With territory in short supply, lions move about near the boundary of the forest and even leave it altogether, often clashing with people. That’s one reason India is creating a second sanctuary. There are other pressing reasons: outbreaks of disease or natural disasters. In 1994a serious disease killed more than a third of Africa’s Serengeti lions a thousand animals--a fate that could easily happen to Gir’s cats. These lions are especially vulnerable to disease because they descend from as few as a dozen individuals. "If you do a DNA test, Asiatic lions actually look like identical twins, "says Stephen O’Brien, a geneticist (基困学家) who has studied them. Yet the dangers are hidden, and you wouldn’t suspect them by watching these lords of the forest. The lions display vitality, and no small measure of charm. Though the gentle intimacy of play vanishes when it’s time to eat, meals in Gir are not necessarily frantic affairs. For a mother and her baby lion sharing a deer, or a young male eating an antelope (羚羊), there’s no need to fight for a cut of the kill. The animals they hunt for food are generally smaller in Git than those in Africa, and hunting groups tend to be smaller as well. In the first paragraph, the author tells Us that Asiatic lions ______.

A.have killed off other lions
B.have descended from African lions
C.used to span vast sections of the globe
D.have lost their habitat

26.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.Take a course.
B.See the city.
C.Go to the park.
D.Take a rest.

27.Passage ThreeQuestions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.

A.It should be assimilated thoroughly.
B.It should be enclosed in quotation marks.
C.It should be paraphrased by the authors.
D.It should be authorized by the source.

28.The current emergency in Mexico City that has taken over our lives is nothing. I could ever have imagined for me or my children, we are living in an environmental crisis, an air-pollution emergency of severity. What it really means is that just to breathe here is to play a dangerous game with your health. As parents, what terrorizes us most are reports that children are at higher risk because they breathe more times per minute. What more can we do to protect them and ourselves Our pediatrician’s (儿科医题 ) medical recommendation was simple: abandon the city permanently. We are foreigners and we are among the small minority that can afford to leave. We are here because of my husband’s work. We are fascinated by Mexico---its history and rich culture. We know that for us, this is a temporary danger. However, we cannot stand for much longer the fear we feel for our boys. We cannot stop them from breathing. But for millions, there is no choice. Their lives, their jobs, their futures depend on being here. Thousands of Mexicans arrive each day in this city, desperate for economic opportunities. Thousands more are born here each day. Entire families work in the streets and practically live there. It is a familiar sight: as parents hawk goods at stoplights, their children play in the grassy highway dividers, breathing exhaust fumes. I feel guilty complaining about my personal situation; we won’t be here long enough for our children to form the impression that skies are colored only gray. And yet the government cannot do what it must to end this problem. For any country, especially a developing Third World economy like Mexico’s, the idea of barring from the capital city enough cars, closing enough factories and spending the necessary billions on public transportation is simply not an option. So when things get bad, as in the current emergency, Mexico takes half measures--prohibiting some more cars from circulating, stopping some factories from producing--that even its own officials concede aren’t adequate. The word "emergency" implies the unusual. But when daily life itself is an emergency, the concept loses its meaning. It is human nature to try to adapt to that which we cannot change. Or to mislead ourselves into believing we can adapt. According to the passage, people in Mexico City are faced with ______.

A.serious air pollution
B.economic crisis.
C.unemployment
D.natural disaster

29.Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.To provide some instructions for the elderly.
B.To remind the elderly of the personal services in the bank.
C.To ask the clerks to offer help for the elderly.
D.To simplify the operation of computerized banking services.

30.Most people think of lions as strictly African beasts, but only because they’ve been killed off almost everywhere else. Ten thousand years ago lions spanned vast sections of the globe. Now lions hold only a small fraction of their former habitat, and Asiatic lions, a subspecies that spit from African lions perhaps 100,000 years ago, hang on to an almost impossibly small slice of their former territory. India is the proud steward of these 300 or so lions, which live primarily in a 560-square-mile sanctuary (保护区). It took me a year and a half to get a permit to explore the entire Gir Forest---and no time at all to see why these lions became symbols of royalty and greatness. A tiger will hide in the forest unseen, but a lion stands its ground, curious and unafraid---lionhearted. Though they told me in subtle ways when I got too close, Gir’s lions allowed me unique glimpses into their lives during my three months in the forest. It’s odd to think that they are threatened by extinction; Gir has as many lions as it can hold--too many, in fact. With territory in short supply, lions move about near the boundary of the forest and even leave it altogether, often clashing with people. That’s one reason India is creating a second sanctuary. There are other pressing reasons: outbreaks of disease or natural disasters. In 1994a serious disease killed more than a third of Africa’s Serengeti lions a thousand animals--a fate that could easily happen to Gir’s cats. These lions are especially vulnerable to disease because they descend from as few as a dozen individuals. "If you do a DNA test, Asiatic lions actually look like identical twins, "says Stephen O’Brien, a geneticist (基困学家) who has studied them. Yet the dangers are hidden, and you wouldn’t suspect them by watching these lords of the forest. The lions display vitality, and no small measure of charm. Though the gentle intimacy of play vanishes when it’s time to eat, meals in Gir are not necessarily frantic affairs. For a mother and her baby lion sharing a deer, or a young male eating an antelope (羚羊), there’s no need to fight for a cut of the kill. The animals they hunt for food are generally smaller in Git than those in Africa, and hunting groups tend to be smaller as well. What impressed the author most when he went to watch the lions in the Gir Forest

A.Their friendliness.
B.Their size.
C.Their intimacy.
D.Their vitality

31.The current emergency in Mexico City that has taken over our lives is nothing. I could ever have imagined for me or my children, we are living in an environmental crisis, an air-pollution emergency of severity. What it really means is that just to breathe here is to play a dangerous game with your health. As parents, what terrorizes us most are reports that children are at higher risk because they breathe more times per minute. What more can we do to protect them and ourselves Our pediatrician’s (儿科医题 ) medical recommendation was simple: abandon the city permanently. We are foreigners and we are among the small minority that can afford to leave. We are here because of my husband’s work. We are fascinated by Mexico---its history and rich culture. We know that for us, this is a temporary danger. However, we cannot stand for much longer the fear we feel for our boys. We cannot stop them from breathing. But for millions, there is no choice. Their lives, their jobs, their futures depend on being here. Thousands of Mexicans arrive each day in this city, desperate for economic opportunities. Thousands more are born here each day. Entire families work in the streets and practically live there. It is a familiar sight: as parents hawk goods at stoplights, their children play in the grassy highway dividers, breathing exhaust fumes. I feel guilty complaining about my personal situation; we won’t be here long enough for our children to form the impression that skies are colored only gray. And yet the government cannot do what it must to end this problem. For any country, especially a developing Third World economy like Mexico’s, the idea of barring from the capital city enough cars, closing enough factories and spending the necessary billions on public transportation is simply not an option. So when things get bad, as in the current emergency, Mexico takes half measures--prohibiting some more cars from circulating, stopping some factories from producing--that even its own officials concede aren’t adequate. The word "emergency" implies the unusual. But when daily life itself is an emergency, the concept loses its meaning. It is human nature to try to adapt to that which we cannot change. Or to mislead ourselves into believing we can adapt. Which of the following statements is TRUE according to the passage

A.Kids are in fewer dangers than grown-ups in Mexico City.
B.The author is a native Mexican.
C.The author’s husband is a pediatrician.
D.The Mexican history and culture appeal to the author.

32.Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.She thinks they are impractical.
B.She thinks they are useful but too expensive.
C.She thinks they are feasible.
D.She thinks they are not instructive enough.

33.Most people think of lions as strictly African beasts, but only because they’ve been killed off almost everywhere else. Ten thousand years ago lions spanned vast sections of the globe. Now lions hold only a small fraction of their former habitat, and Asiatic lions, a subspecies that spit from African lions perhaps 100,000 years ago, hang on to an almost impossibly small slice of their former territory. India is the proud steward of these 300 or so lions, which live primarily in a 560-square-mile sanctuary (保护区). It took me a year and a half to get a permit to explore the entire Gir Forest---and no time at all to see why these lions became symbols of royalty and greatness. A tiger will hide in the forest unseen, but a lion stands its ground, curious and unafraid---lionhearted. Though they told me in subtle ways when I got too close, Gir’s lions allowed me unique glimpses into their lives during my three months in the forest. It’s odd to think that they are threatened by extinction; Gir has as many lions as it can hold--too many, in fact. With territory in short supply, lions move about near the boundary of the forest and even leave it altogether, often clashing with people. That’s one reason India is creating a second sanctuary. There are other pressing reasons: outbreaks of disease or natural disasters. In 1994a serious disease killed more than a third of Africa’s Serengeti lions a thousand animals--a fate that could easily happen to Gir’s cats. These lions are especially vulnerable to disease because they descend from as few as a dozen individuals. "If you do a DNA test, Asiatic lions actually look like identical twins, "says Stephen O’Brien, a geneticist (基困学家) who has studied them. Yet the dangers are hidden, and you wouldn’t suspect them by watching these lords of the forest. The lions display vitality, and no small measure of charm. Though the gentle intimacy of play vanishes when it’s time to eat, meals in Gir are not necessarily frantic affairs. For a mother and her baby lion sharing a deer, or a young male eating an antelope (羚羊), there’s no need to fight for a cut of the kill. The animals they hunt for food are generally smaller in Git than those in Africa, and hunting groups tend to be smaller as well. One of the reasons why India is creating a secondary sanctuary for the Asiatic lions is that ______.

A.the present sanctuary is not large enough
B.scientists want to do more research on them
C.they have killed many people
D.the forest is shrinking in size

34.Every living thing has what scientists call a biological clock that controls behavior. It tells plants when to (62) flowers and insects when to leave protective cocoon (茧)and fly away. And it tells animals and human beings when to (63) , sleep and seek food. It controls our body temperatures, the (64) of some hormones and even dreams. Events (65) the plant and animal affect its actions. Scientists recently found that a tiny animal called Siberian hamster changes the color of its (66) because of the number of hours of (67) In shorter days of winter its fur becomes white. The fur becomes gray-brown in longer (68) of daylight in summer. (69) signals control other biological clocks. German scientists found that some internal one seems to order birds to begin their (70) flights two times each year. Birds prevented from flying become (71) when it is time for the trip. (72) they become calm again when the time of the flight has ended. A mix of outside and internal events controls some biological clocks; such things as heartbeat and the daily change from sleep to walking take place because of both external and internal signals. Scientists are beginning to learn (73) parts of the brain contain the biological clocks. A researcher at Harvard University, Dr. Martin Moore Ede, said a small group of cells near the front of the brain seemed to control the (74) of some of our actions. Probably there are other cells to control other body activities. He is studying (75) they affect the way we do our work. Most of us have great difficulty if we (76) often change to different work hours. (77) can take many days for a human body to (78) a major change in work hours. Industrial officials should have a better (79) of biological clocks and how they affect workers. He said such an understanding could (80) sickness and accidents at work, and would help increase (81) .

A.form
B.bloom
C.blossom
D.boom

35.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.Looking for an apartment.
B.Taking a suburban excursion.
C.Looking for a job.
D.Asking the man for his opinions.

36.The current emergency in Mexico City that has taken over our lives is nothing. I could ever have imagined for me or my children, we are living in an environmental crisis, an air-pollution emergency of severity. What it really means is that just to breathe here is to play a dangerous game with your health. As parents, what terrorizes us most are reports that children are at higher risk because they breathe more times per minute. What more can we do to protect them and ourselves Our pediatrician’s (儿科医题 ) medical recommendation was simple: abandon the city permanently. We are foreigners and we are among the small minority that can afford to leave. We are here because of my husband’s work. We are fascinated by Mexico---its history and rich culture. We know that for us, this is a temporary danger. However, we cannot stand for much longer the fear we feel for our boys. We cannot stop them from breathing. But for millions, there is no choice. Their lives, their jobs, their futures depend on being here. Thousands of Mexicans arrive each day in this city, desperate for economic opportunities. Thousands more are born here each day. Entire families work in the streets and practically live there. It is a familiar sight: as parents hawk goods at stoplights, their children play in the grassy highway dividers, breathing exhaust fumes. I feel guilty complaining about my personal situation; we won’t be here long enough for our children to form the impression that skies are colored only gray. And yet the government cannot do what it must to end this problem. For any country, especially a developing Third World economy like Mexico’s, the idea of barring from the capital city enough cars, closing enough factories and spending the necessary billions on public transportation is simply not an option. So when things get bad, as in the current emergency, Mexico takes half measures--prohibiting some more cars from circulating, stopping some factories from producing--that even its own officials concede aren’t adequate. The word "emergency" implies the unusual. But when daily life itself is an emergency, the concept loses its meaning. It is human nature to try to adapt to that which we cannot change. Or to mislead ourselves into believing we can adapt. The word "hawk" (Para. 3) most probably means ______.

A.sell
B.transport
C.place
D.deliver

37.Every living thing has what scientists call a biological clock that controls behavior. It tells plants when to (62) flowers and insects when to leave protective cocoon (茧)and fly away. And it tells animals and human beings when to (63) , sleep and seek food. It controls our body temperatures, the (64) of some hormones and even dreams. Events (65) the plant and animal affect its actions. Scientists recently found that a tiny animal called Siberian hamster changes the color of its (66) because of the number of hours of (67) In shorter days of winter its fur becomes white. The fur becomes gray-brown in longer (68) of daylight in summer. (69) signals control other biological clocks. German scientists found that some internal one seems to order birds to begin their (70) flights two times each year. Birds prevented from flying become (71) when it is time for the trip. (72) they become calm again when the time of the flight has ended. A mix of outside and internal events controls some biological clocks; such things as heartbeat and the daily change from sleep to walking take place because of both external and internal signals. Scientists are beginning to learn (73) parts of the brain contain the biological clocks. A researcher at Harvard University, Dr. Martin Moore Ede, said a small group of cells near the front of the brain seemed to control the (74) of some of our actions. Probably there are other cells to control other body activities. He is studying (75) they affect the way we do our work. Most of us have great difficulty if we (76) often change to different work hours. (77) can take many days for a human body to (78) a major change in work hours. Industrial officials should have a better (79) of biological clocks and how they affect workers. He said such an understanding could (80) sickness and accidents at work, and would help increase (81) .

A.walk
B.cry
C.guard
D.awaken

38.Most people think of lions as strictly African beasts, but only because they’ve been killed off almost everywhere else. Ten thousand years ago lions spanned vast sections of the globe. Now lions hold only a small fraction of their former habitat, and Asiatic lions, a subspecies that spit from African lions perhaps 100,000 years ago, hang on to an almost impossibly small slice of their former territory. India is the proud steward of these 300 or so lions, which live primarily in a 560-square-mile sanctuary (保护区). It took me a year and a half to get a permit to explore the entire Gir Forest---and no time at all to see why these lions became symbols of royalty and greatness. A tiger will hide in the forest unseen, but a lion stands its ground, curious and unafraid---lionhearted. Though they told me in subtle ways when I got too close, Gir’s lions allowed me unique glimpses into their lives during my three months in the forest. It’s odd to think that they are threatened by extinction; Gir has as many lions as it can hold--too many, in fact. With territory in short supply, lions move about near the boundary of the forest and even leave it altogether, often clashing with people. That’s one reason India is creating a second sanctuary. There are other pressing reasons: outbreaks of disease or natural disasters. In 1994a serious disease killed more than a third of Africa’s Serengeti lions a thousand animals--a fate that could easily happen to Gir’s cats. These lions are especially vulnerable to disease because they descend from as few as a dozen individuals. "If you do a DNA test, Asiatic lions actually look like identical twins, "says Stephen O’Brien, a geneticist (基困学家) who has studied them. Yet the dangers are hidden, and you wouldn’t suspect them by watching these lords of the forest. The lions display vitality, and no small measure of charm. Though the gentle intimacy of play vanishes when it’s time to eat, meals in Gir are not necessarily frantic affairs. For a mother and her baby lion sharing a deer, or a young male eating an antelope (羚羊), there’s no need to fight for a cut of the kill. The animals they hunt for food are generally smaller in Git than those in Africa, and hunting groups tend to be smaller as well. The lions in the Gir Forest are especially vulnerable to disease because they ______.

A.have descended from a dozen or so ancestors
B.are smaller than the African lions
C.do not have enough to cat
D.are physically weaker than the African lions

39.The current emergency in Mexico City that has taken over our lives is nothing. I could ever have imagined for me or my children, we are living in an environmental crisis, an air-pollution emergency of severity. What it really means is that just to breathe here is to play a dangerous game with your health. As parents, what terrorizes us most are reports that children are at higher risk because they breathe more times per minute. What more can we do to protect them and ourselves Our pediatrician’s (儿科医题 ) medical recommendation was simple: abandon the city permanently. We are foreigners and we are among the small minority that can afford to leave. We are here because of my husband’s work. We are fascinated by Mexico---its history and rich culture. We know that for us, this is a temporary danger. However, we cannot stand for much longer the fear we feel for our boys. We cannot stop them from breathing. But for millions, there is no choice. Their lives, their jobs, their futures depend on being here. Thousands of Mexicans arrive each day in this city, desperate for economic opportunities. Thousands more are born here each day. Entire families work in the streets and practically live there. It is a familiar sight: as parents hawk goods at stoplights, their children play in the grassy highway dividers, breathing exhaust fumes. I feel guilty complaining about my personal situation; we won’t be here long enough for our children to form the impression that skies are colored only gray. And yet the government cannot do what it must to end this problem. For any country, especially a developing Third World economy like Mexico’s, the idea of barring from the capital city enough cars, closing enough factories and spending the necessary billions on public transportation is simply not an option. So when things get bad, as in the current emergency, Mexico takes half measures--prohibiting some more cars from circulating, stopping some factories from producing--that even its own officials concede aren’t adequate. The word "emergency" implies the unusual. But when daily life itself is an emergency, the concept loses its meaning. It is human nature to try to adapt to that which we cannot change. Or to mislead ourselves into believing we can adapt. The Mexican government takes half measures to solve the pollution problem because ______.

A.Mexican economy depends very much on cars and factories
B.it is not wise enough to come up with effective measures
C.Mexicans are able to adapt themselves to the current emergency
D.Mexicans enjoy playing dangerous games with their health

40.Most people think of lions as strictly African beasts, but only because they’ve been killed off almost everywhere else. Ten thousand years ago lions spanned vast sections of the globe. Now lions hold only a small fraction of their former habitat, and Asiatic lions, a subspecies that spit from African lions perhaps 100,000 years ago, hang on to an almost impossibly small slice of their former territory. India is the proud steward of these 300 or so lions, which live primarily in a 560-square-mile sanctuary (保护区). It took me a year and a half to get a permit to explore the entire Gir Forest---and no time at all to see why these lions became symbols of royalty and greatness. A tiger will hide in the forest unseen, but a lion stands its ground, curious and unafraid---lionhearted. Though they told me in subtle ways when I got too close, Gir’s lions allowed me unique glimpses into their lives during my three months in the forest. It’s odd to think that they are threatened by extinction; Gir has as many lions as it can hold--too many, in fact. With territory in short supply, lions move about near the boundary of the forest and even leave it altogether, often clashing with people. That’s one reason India is creating a second sanctuary. There are other pressing reasons: outbreaks of disease or natural disasters. In 1994a serious disease killed more than a third of Africa’s Serengeti lions a thousand animals--a fate that could easily happen to Gir’s cats. These lions are especially vulnerable to disease because they descend from as few as a dozen individuals. "If you do a DNA test, Asiatic lions actually look like identical twins, "says Stephen O’Brien, a geneticist (基困学家) who has studied them. Yet the dangers are hidden, and you wouldn’t suspect them by watching these lords of the forest. The lions display vitality, and no small measure of charm. Though the gentle intimacy of play vanishes when it’s time to eat, meals in Gir are not necessarily frantic affairs. For a mother and her baby lion sharing a deer, or a young male eating an antelope (羚羊), there’s no need to fight for a cut of the kill. The animals they hunt for food are generally smaller in Git than those in Africa, and hunting groups tend to be smaller as well. What does the sentence "... meals in Gir are not necessarily frantic affair" (Para. 3) mean

A.The lions do not show intimacy among them any more.
B.The lions may not need to fight for food.
C.Food is not readily available in that region.
D.Meals can be obtained only with great effort.

41.Every living thing has what scientists call a biological clock that controls behavior. It tells plants when to (62) flowers and insects when to leave protective cocoon (茧)and fly away. And it tells animals and human beings when to (63) , sleep and seek food. It controls our body temperatures, the (64) of some hormones and even dreams. Events (65) the plant and animal affect its actions. Scientists recently found that a tiny animal called Siberian hamster changes the color of its (66) because of the number of hours of (67) In shorter days of winter its fur becomes white. The fur becomes gray-brown in longer (68) of daylight in summer. (69) signals control other biological clocks. German scientists found that some internal one seems to order birds to begin their (70) flights two times each year. Birds prevented from flying become (71) when it is time for the trip. (72) they become calm again when the time of the flight has ended. A mix of outside and internal events controls some biological clocks; such things as heartbeat and the daily change from sleep to walking take place because of both external and internal signals. Scientists are beginning to learn (73) parts of the brain contain the biological clocks. A researcher at Harvard University, Dr. Martin Moore Ede, said a small group of cells near the front of the brain seemed to control the (74) of some of our actions. Probably there are other cells to control other body activities. He is studying (75) they affect the way we do our work. Most of us have great difficulty if we (76) often change to different work hours. (77) can take many days for a human body to (78) a major change in work hours. Industrial officials should have a better (79) of biological clocks and how they affect workers. He said such an understanding could (80) sickness and accidents at work, and would help increase (81) .

A.reaction
B.release
C.relief
D.recovery

42.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.Jimmy is going to set out tonight.
B.Jimmy has not decided on his journey.
C.There is no need to have a farewell dinner.
D.They may have a dinner when Jimmy’s back.

43.The current emergency in Mexico City that has taken over our lives is nothing. I could ever have imagined for me or my children, we are living in an environmental crisis, an air-pollution emergency of severity. What it really means is that just to breathe here is to play a dangerous game with your health. As parents, what terrorizes us most are reports that children are at higher risk because they breathe more times per minute. What more can we do to protect them and ourselves Our pediatrician’s (儿科医题 ) medical recommendation was simple: abandon the city permanently. We are foreigners and we are among the small minority that can afford to leave. We are here because of my husband’s work. We are fascinated by Mexico---its history and rich culture. We know that for us, this is a temporary danger. However, we cannot stand for much longer the fear we feel for our boys. We cannot stop them from breathing. But for millions, there is no choice. Their lives, their jobs, their futures depend on being here. Thousands of Mexicans arrive each day in this city, desperate for economic opportunities. Thousands more are born here each day. Entire families work in the streets and practically live there. It is a familiar sight: as parents hawk goods at stoplights, their children play in the grassy highway dividers, breathing exhaust fumes. I feel guilty complaining about my personal situation; we won’t be here long enough for our children to form the impression that skies are colored only gray. And yet the government cannot do what it must to end this problem. For any country, especially a developing Third World economy like Mexico’s, the idea of barring from the capital city enough cars, closing enough factories and spending the necessary billions on public transportation is simply not an option. So when things get bad, as in the current emergency, Mexico takes half measures--prohibiting some more cars from circulating, stopping some factories from producing--that even its own officials concede aren’t adequate. The word "emergency" implies the unusual. But when daily life itself is an emergency, the concept loses its meaning. It is human nature to try to adapt to that which we cannot change. Or to mislead ourselves into believing we can adapt. The purpose of the passage is to ______.

A.describe the harmful air pollution
B.explain the way to prevent air pollution
C.show the worries about the air pollution
D.recommend a method to avoid air pollution

44.Every living thing has what scientists call a biological clock that controls behavior. It tells plants when to (62) flowers and insects when to leave protective cocoon (茧)and fly away. And it tells animals and human beings when to (63) , sleep and seek food. It controls our body temperatures, the (64) of some hormones and even dreams. Events (65) the plant and animal affect its actions. Scientists recently found that a tiny animal called Siberian hamster changes the color of its (66) because of the number of hours of (67) In shorter days of winter its fur becomes white. The fur becomes gray-brown in longer (68) of daylight in summer. (69) signals control other biological clocks. German scientists found that some internal one seems to order birds to begin their (70) flights two times each year. Birds prevented from flying become (71) when it is time for the trip. (72) they become calm again when the time of the flight has ended. A mix of outside and internal events controls some biological clocks; such things as heartbeat and the daily change from sleep to walking take place because of both external and internal signals. Scientists are beginning to learn (73) parts of the brain contain the biological clocks. A researcher at Harvard University, Dr. Martin Moore Ede, said a small group of cells near the front of the brain seemed to control the (74) of some of our actions. Probably there are other cells to control other body activities. He is studying (75) they affect the way we do our work. Most of us have great difficulty if we (76) often change to different work hours. (77) can take many days for a human body to (78) a major change in work hours. Industrial officials should have a better (79) of biological clocks and how they affect workers. He said such an understanding could (80) sickness and accidents at work, and would help increase (81) .

A.beside
B.inside
C.outside
D.aside

45.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.Everyone enjoyed himself at John’s party.
B.The woman didn’t enjoy John’s parties at all.
C.It will be the first time for the man to attend John’s party.
D.The woman is glad to be invited to John’s house-warming party.

46.Every living thing has what scientists call a biological clock that controls behavior. It tells plants when to (62) flowers and insects when to leave protective cocoon (茧)and fly away. And it tells animals and human beings when to (63) , sleep and seek food. It controls our body temperatures, the (64) of some hormones and even dreams. Events (65) the plant and animal affect its actions. Scientists recently found that a tiny animal called Siberian hamster changes the color of its (66) because of the number of hours of (67) In shorter days of winter its fur becomes white. The fur becomes gray-brown in longer (68) of daylight in summer. (69) signals control other biological clocks. German scientists found that some internal one seems to order birds to begin their (70) flights two times each year. Birds prevented from flying become (71) when it is time for the trip. (72) they become calm again when the time of the flight has ended. A mix of outside and internal events controls some biological clocks; such things as heartbeat and the daily change from sleep to walking take place because of both external and internal signals. Scientists are beginning to learn (73) parts of the brain contain the biological clocks. A researcher at Harvard University, Dr. Martin Moore Ede, said a small group of cells near the front of the brain seemed to control the (74) of some of our actions. Probably there are other cells to control other body activities. He is studying (75) they affect the way we do our work. Most of us have great difficulty if we (76) often change to different work hours. (77) can take many days for a human body to (78) a major change in work hours. Industrial officials should have a better (79) of biological clocks and how they affect workers. He said such an understanding could (80) sickness and accidents at work, and would help increase (81) .

A.skin
B.feather
C.peel
D.fur

47.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.He enjoyed the paintings too.
B.He can’t finish his term paper that day.
C.He has to finish his term paper first.
D.He has learned something about the artists.

48.Every living thing has what scientists call a biological clock that controls behavior. It tells plants when to (62) flowers and insects when to leave protective cocoon (茧)and fly away. And it tells animals and human beings when to (63) , sleep and seek food. It controls our body temperatures, the (64) of some hormones and even dreams. Events (65) the plant and animal affect its actions. Scientists recently found that a tiny animal called Siberian hamster changes the color of its (66) because of the number of hours of (67) In shorter days of winter its fur becomes white. The fur becomes gray-brown in longer (68) of daylight in summer. (69) signals control other biological clocks. German scientists found that some internal one seems to order birds to begin their (70) flights two times each year. Birds prevented from flying become (71) when it is time for the trip. (72) they become calm again when the time of the flight has ended. A mix of outside and internal events controls some biological clocks; such things as heartbeat and the daily change from sleep to walking take place because of both external and internal signals. Scientists are beginning to learn (73) parts of the brain contain the biological clocks. A researcher at Harvard University, Dr. Martin Moore Ede, said a small group of cells near the front of the brain seemed to control the (74) of some of our actions. Probably there are other cells to control other body activities. He is studying (75) they affect the way we do our work. Most of us have great difficulty if we (76) often change to different work hours. (77) can take many days for a human body to (78) a major change in work hours. Industrial officials should have a better (79) of biological clocks and how they affect workers. He said such an understanding could (80) sickness and accidents at work, and would help increase (81) .

A.night
B.daylight
C.light
D.day

49.Questions 11 to 18 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

A.He bas learned a lot from his own mistakes.
B.He is quite experienced in training wild dogs.
C.He finds reward more effective than punishment.
D.He thinks it important to master basic training skills.

50.Every living thing has what scientists call a biological clock that controls behavior. It tells plants when to (62) flowers and insects when to leave protective cocoon (茧)and fly away. And it tells animals and human beings when to (63) , sleep and seek food. It controls our body temperatures, the (64) of some hormones and even dreams. Events (65) the plant and animal affect its actions. Scientists recently found that a tiny animal called Siberian hamster changes the color of its (66) because of the number of hours of (67) In shorter days of winter its fur becomes white. The fur becomes gray-brown in longer (68) of daylight in summer. (69) signals control other biological clocks. German scientists found that some internal one seems to order birds to begin their (70) flights two times each year. Birds prevented from flying become (71) when it is time for the trip. (72) they become calm again when the time of the flight has ended. A mix of outside and internal events controls some biological clocks; such things as heartbeat and the daily change from sleep to walking take place because of both external and internal signals. Scientists are beginning to learn (73) parts of the brain contain the biological clocks. A researcher at Harvard University, Dr. Martin Moore Ede, said a small group of cells near the front of the brain seemed to control the (74) of some of our actions. Probably there are other cells to control other body activities. He is studying (75) they affect the way we do our work. Most of us have great difficulty if we (76) often change to different work hours. (77) can take many days for a human body to (78) a major change in work hours. Industrial officials should have a better (79) of biological clocks and how they affect workers. He said such an understanding could (80) sickness and accidents at work, and would help increase (81) .

A.days
B.lights
C.times
D.hours

试卷来源:易哈佛

总分:100分

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